Monday, 9 February 2009

Currant Buns

Makes 15
4 oz soft margarine
4 oz granulated sugar
8 oz SR flour
2 medium eggs
4oz dried fruit
a little milk
Preheat oven to 190'C (fan) and place paper cases in a bun tin.
1. Cream together margarine and sugar.
2. Beat in eggs, adding a little flour if necessary.
3. Fold in flour and fruit.
4. Add milk, if necessary, to form a soft dropping consistency.
5. Spoon into bun cases, until 3/4 full.
6. Bake for approximately 12-15 minutes.

16 comments:

  1. What do you do with the milk?

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  2. Well noticed Ruth - I have amended the recipe. Thank you, Pj x

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  3. Living in Thailand makes it very difficult to find decent cakes so I've managed after much searching to buy an oven and now I will bake some of your buns !

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  4. Aren't these just fairy cakes. Not Currant Buns???????????????

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  5. I think they look like fairy cakes too, buns should be soft and doughy!

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  6. Depends where you are born and raised. In the UK those are known as buns especially if you are a northerner. My Mum used to bake them all the time.

    However you can have all sorts of other buns sch as hot cross buns and these are made differently. You can also have things like Choux buns which are made of pastry!

    Fairy cakes don't have currants in as far as I am aware do they?

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    1. These are fairy cakes with dried fruit in them. Buns like Hot-Cross Buns, Currant Buns and Chelsea Buns are all absed on "basic bun mix". Bun mix is more like bread and are made with strong flour and yeast.

      I'm fom the UK too, and I am a baker ;)

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  7. I use this recipe, my mum has used similar for many years and we call them currant buns, easy and tasty.

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  8. Hi all and thank you for your comments. I seem to have inadvertently started quite a debate! I originate from Norfolk and these are an old recipe and have always been called buns. We also have fairy cakes in Norfolk ;) and the differences are that these buns contain fruit and the mixture is slightly denser than a fairy cake so as to hold the fruit evenly throughout the bun. I hope this clears this question up. Best wishes, Pj x

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  9. I live in the southwest and this is a basic bun mix for us carrot crunchers to lol, tasty easy to make and obviously not a fairy cake otherwise would have wings ;)

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  10. These look and sound just like the currant buns my mum used to bake for tea and I'm so glad to have found the recipe. Thank you, will make for my granddaughters tomorrow. We lived in Surrey and Hampshire.

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  11. Love these, my granddaughters look forward to them after school and will eat 3 each, and I can change, add orange zest, cranberries, choc chips etc. Better each time I make them.

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  12. My partner wanted some muffins with currants in instead of chic chips said I think you mean currant buns ha .... Just shown him picture ,.... Reply oh yes that's them ... Memories of cooking with mum when we were small lovely so making these tomorrow thanks looking forward to them

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    1. This message is by Jacqui George partner ha

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  13. great little buns. Just like my mum used to make, first successful I have had making buns like hers. Thank you

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  14. My mum always called them currant buns. She made them all the time

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